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Large Calla Lily test

Also known as arum lillies these long-lasting elegant flowers in a small pot are great on a window-sill in the conservatory or garden. This hardy perennial plant grows from bulbs or 'corms' and has exotic trumpet shaped flowers in a range of colours.
Current Description
These stunning calla lillies are available this week in a beautiful raspberry pink and will add a splash of colour to any living space.
50cm high+ in a 1L pot
Calla Lily Large Calla Lily   test          Large Calla Lily   test
Calla Lily
Care Instrictions

These instructions are sent with the plant gift

These flowering bulbs should last several weeks indoors or in a sheltered spot outside.

Calla Lilies will do best with plenty of light but not direct sunlight. Place near a window or in an enclosed porch or conservatory. They don’t like extremes of heat, so try to protect your plant from radiators, cold wind and cold draughts. The cooler they are kept the longer the flowers will last but they will suffer if exposed to extreme cold or frost.

Water your lilies regularly but moderately. The surface of the compost should be slightly damp, but not wet.

At the natural end of their flowering period, the flowers will fade to green. These are bulb plants, and, with care, they can be coaxed to flower next year. The leaves should be tied and allowed to wither away in the autumn before being cut back in the winter ready for fresh growth in spring.

Don’t worry if you notice water drops forming at the end of the leaves and bending the leaves over. This is a natural response to an indoor climate. However, if the leaves droop completely and collapse you need to water your plant more regularly. Calla Lilies are creatures of habit and can react to a sudden change in situation. If you notice yellow leaves, cut these back to allow new growth to develop. Brown marks, particularly on the edges of the flowers, usually indicate bruising of these fleshy plants.