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Shamrock

This it the most widely recognised shamrock (Trifolium Dubium) and is a low growing clover with pretty yellow flowers in season. Shamrock plants are thought to be lucky and are celebrated as the national symbol of both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
Current Description
Great gifts to celebrate St Patrick's Day or to wish luck and good fortune. The first of our new season plants are now starting to fill out nicely as in the main picture and over the coming weeks and months they will continue to grow on and bush out. Always popular for March deliveries reserve yours now to ensure delivery in time for St Patrick's Day.
13cm tall in a 1L pot
Shamrock Shamrock                 Shamrock                 Shamrock                 Shamrock
Shamrock
Care Instrictions

These instructions are sent with the plant gift

This is the most widely recognised shamrock (Trifolium Dubium) and is a low growing clover with pretty yellow flowers in season. Shamrock plants are thought to be lucky and are celebrated as the national symbol of both northern and southern Ireland.

Shamrock plants grow in peat bogs in Ireland but are also at home in a range of soils and even on the windowsill. Keep the soil moist all the times by watering regularly from the bottom. They do best in half-light, so east or west-facing windowsill is ideal and the cooler the position, the quicker and bushier your shamrock will grow. They can be planted out in the garden in semi-shaded spot and look good tumbling over rockeries.

Problem solving

Watch out for botrytis or mould on the lower leaves. Usually this is a sign of uneven watering so return to a more regular watering routing and you might try your plant outside.

Occasionally changes in watering or temperature can trigger your plant into hibernation and over a period of a few days, the foliage can die back quite rapidly. This is a natural response to a change in climate and your plant will come back again in time.

However if this does happen you will need to hold back on the watering until the soil and the plant dries out completely and it is a good idea to trim the dead foliage off. After a few weeks you can start to water again but only a dribble every few days until you see signs of life emerging.